Monthly Archives: March 2013

3/25/2013 Highlights


On Monday, March 25, 2013, at 2:20 P.M., I testified in opposition of HB642 HD1 that increases the amount of marijuana a medical marijuana patient can possess from 3 mature and 4 immature marijuana plants to 7 marijuana plants regardless of maturity, and from 1 ounce to 5 ounces of usable marijuana. The bill also increases the amount of patients a primary caregiver can oversee from 1 to 3.

In the evening, I exercised for the 25th time in 2013 by working on my abs, arms, and back for my strength training and running 8.14 miles in Honolulu for my cardio training.

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3/24/2013 Family Time


On Sunday, March 24, 2013, from 3:30 P.M., I spent time with my mom, dad, and sister Lara at my parents’ house in Pearl City where my dad cooked prime rib and I cooked side dishes – zucchini and asparagus.

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3/23/2013 Highlights


On March 23, 2013 at 9:30 A.M., I exercised for the 24th time for 2013 at Mililani 24-Hour Fitness where I worked on my abs, chest, and triceps, and ran 9.05 miles on the treadmill.

At 2:30 P.M. I watched the Gonzaga University basketball team play against Wichita State at my home in Waikele. Unfortunately Gonzaga lossed but I am proud of their West Coast Conference Championship and 32-3 season. Plus, many of their star players will be able to return next season.

In the evening, I hung out with Lina Han and Katherine Pak at Kissaten and a Korean restaurant in Honolulu.

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3/22/2013 Highlights


On March 22, 2013, Deputy Prosecuting Attorney Thalia Murphy won a sexual assault trial in State v. Dewitt Lamar Long in which Defendant Long raped a 13 year old girl. In another case, Long raped another underage girl. Deputy Prosecuting Attorney is seeking an extended term of imprisonment because of Long’s history as a persistent offender.

March 22nd was also the lateral deadline at the Hawaii State Legislature where bills that are passed into the last committee they were referred to remain alive.

7 out of 11 Honolulu Prosecuting legislation are still alive for the 2013 legislative session:

SB418 that increases per diem for out-of-state witnesses;

SB873, SD2, HD1 that expands the ways the State can collect criminal restitution from offenders such as income withholding, tax refund withholding, and bail withholding;

SB880, SD1, HD1 that requires the court to impose a mandatory minimum term of imprisonment without possibility of parole or probation for a person convicted of certain acts of sexual assault against a minor under the age of twelve years.

SB978 that imposes a mandatory sentence of one year of imprisonment on a defendant convicted of cruelty to animals in the second degree involving five or more pet animals in any one instance;

HB231, HD1; SB870, SD1, HD1 that clarifies what acts of parental discipline are not applicable as a defense such as one who intentionally, knowingly, recklessly, or negligently does the following: throwing, kicking, burning, biting, cutting, striking with a closed fist, shaking a minor under three years of age, interfering with breathing, or threatening with a deadly weapon.

HB235, HD1 that amends the definition of “victim” in the victim restitution law to include certain duly incorporated humane societies or duly incorporated societies for the prevention of cruelty to animals; and

HB200, HD1 that includes an appropriation for the Department of the Honolulu Prosecuting Attorney.

In the evening, I hung out with Honolulu Deputy Prosecuting Attorney Allen Yadao and friends from the Hawaii Attorney General’s office.

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3/21/2013 Highlights


On March 21, 2013 at 10:00 A.M., before the Hawaii House Public Safety Committee, I testified in support of our Honolulu Prosecuting Attorney bill, SB880 SD1 that requires the court to impose a mandatory minimum term of imprisonment without possibility of parole or probation for a person convicted of acts of sexual assault penetration against a minor under the age of twelve years.

I also testifeid in support of the Law Enforcement Coalition’s bill, SB1016 SD1 that adds comparable foreign convictions and tribal convictions to covered offenses; makes offenders who are subject to sex offender registration or notification in their jurisdiction of conviction, covered offenders under Hawaii law; makes it clear that a covered offender must register and report the offender’s permanent residence, current temporary residence, or if an address is not available, a description of the place or area in which the covered offender resides; amends the definition of “conviction” in section 846E-1, Hawaii Revised Statutes, to clarify that conviction, for purposes of sex offender registration, occurs on the date judgment is entered; creates a tier classification for any covered sexual offenses that are not clearly included within the current tier classification law; addresses the problem of covered offenders who do not have registered residences to which the post office can deliver mail and cannot receive the ninety-day verification mailings by requiring these offenders to report in person during the first weeks of the months of January, April, July, and October; and repeals the definitions of “mental abnormality, “personality disorder,” and “predatory.”

In the evening I exercised for the 23rd time for 2013. For strength training, I worked on my abs, arms, and back. For cardio, I ran 5.45 miles in Honolulu.

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3/20/2013 Highlights


On March 20, 2013, at 8:30 A.M., I testified before the Hawaii House Health Committe in opposition of SB642 proposed HD1 that increases the amount of marijuana a medical marijuana patient can possess from 3 mature and 4 immature marijuana plants to 7 marijuana plants regardless of maturity, and from 1 ounce to 5 ounces of usable marijuana. The bill also increases the amount of patients a primary caregiver can oversee from 1 to 3. We believe the medical marijuana law should not be changed.

At 2:15 P.M. before the Senate Health Committee, Honolulu Deputy Prosecuting Attorney Tricia Nakamatsu and I testified in opposition to HB910 HD2, which establishes a 1 year limit to the length of conditional release for petty misdemeanor and misdemeanor charges; clarifies circumstances under which the one-year conditional release may be tolled; and requires information-sharing among public agencies. We opose the 1 year limitation on offenders being treated by the state hospital because any person on conditional releases are still a danger to self or others. Rather then an across the board discharge of offenders after 1 year, there should be a case-by-case analysis in deciding who should be discharged from medical care. I mentioned that if the state hospital does not want to oversee offenders who are deemed dangerous than at least contract an organization that is willing to treat them for their mental illness in order to protect the public.

At 5:30 P.M., together with Deputy Prosecuting Attorney Tricia Nakamatsu, Deputy Prosecuting Attorney Allen Yadao, and Mike Noguchi, I attended Representative Clift Tsuji and Representative Kyle Yamashita’s campaign fundraiser at Mandalay Restaurant in Downtown Honolulu.

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3/19/2013 Highlights


On Tuesday, March 19, 2013, at 9:00 A.M., Deputy Prosecuting Attorney Tricia Nakamatsu testified before the Hawaii Senate Ways and Means Committee in support of HB200 HD1 relating to the state budget, supporting an appropriation for the Department of the Prosecuting Attorney of the City and County of Honolulu.

At 2:00 P.M., I testified before the Hawaii House Judiciary Committee in support of our department’s SB873 SD2 that creates standards and procedures for income-withholding, for purposes of enforcing restitution orders; amends the definition of “debt” relating to the recovery of money owed to the State to include court-ordered restitution subject to civil enforcement; provides priority of income withholding orders; removes court’s authority to revoke restitution once ordered; extends victims’ access to adult probation records, to include access to payment compliance records, for purposes of enforcing restitution orders; requires that any bail posted by a defendant be applied toward payment of any court-ordered restitution in the same case; and makes an unspecified appropriation to the judiciary for the purpose of enhancing restitution collection.

In the evening, I exercised for the 22nd time for 2013. I did strength training for my abs and shoulder, and cardio by running 4.77 miles in Honolulu.

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