2/7/2013 Highlights


2/7/2013 Highlights:

At 10:00 A.M. before the Senate Judiciary and Labor Committee, Deputy Prosecuting Attorney Tricia Nakamatsu testified in opposition to SB346 that permits a court to dispose of a juvenile case by referring the defendant to a restorative justice program when the court deems it would be in the best interest of the child and the child admits guilt. Nakamatsu also testified in opposition to SB346 that Proposes a constitutional amendment authorizing the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court to appoint judges who have retired upon attaining the age of seventy years as emeritus judges, permitting the appointed judges to serve as temporary judges in courts no higher than the court level they reached prior to retirement and for terms not to exceed three months. Victim Witness Advocate Director Dennis Dunn testified in support of SB509 that proposes an amendment to the Constitution of the State of Hawaii guaranteeing that crime victims and their immediate surviving family members have specific rights related to information pertaining to and participation in the criminal justice process.

At 11:00 A.M. before the House Public Safety Committtee and House Transportation Committtee, I testified in support of HB1013 that includes sheriff’s vehicles in the definition of “emergency vehicle” under the requirement that motorists “move over” when passing a stationary emergency vehicle on a highway. I also testified in support of HB1308 that Adds civil defense and county emergency management vehicles to the definition of “emergency vehicle” under the move over law.

At 1:15 P.M., before the Senate Committee on Public Safety, Iintergovernmental and Military Affairs and
Senate Committee on Technology and the Arts, Deputy Prosecuting Attorney Tricia Nakamatsu testified in opposition to SB61 that creates procedural and administrative requirements for law enforcement agencies for eyewitness identifications of suspects in criminal investigations; and grants a defendant the right to challenge any eyewitness identification to be used at trial in a pretrial evidentiary hearing.

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