Tag Archives: fears

The Resistance


Dream for 11/5/2021

I dreamt I was driving a car through a nicer part of a dreary town in the Midwest of the United States.

In another scene, I was on a mountain where I met three Native American boys ages 11 to 12 who were wearing traditional outfits worn before the Caucasians forced their culture upon them. They had horses for their transportation. I joined them. We embarked on a quest to fight the resistance, the forces that beat humans down until they submit to the slavery of popular culture.

The boys and I quickly became friends. By being with them, the child in me fully returned. I was no longer an adult. Imagination was thriving in me again.

We fought off different elements of nature under control by humankind such as hay and manure. It attacked us like beasts. We fought them off and defeated them. When we were finally free from the control of humankind’s overwhelming culture. It was just the four of us on the top of the mountain with nature. Trees, shrubs, and breeze. It was wonderful!

When it was time for the boys to depart, they hopped on their horses and rode them backward down the mountain. I felt so sad. I could tell they were too by the looks on their faces. We watched each other as their horses slowly walked backwards down the mountain toward the great plains.

In the final scene, the three Native American boys were walking through a crowded sandy beach in Hawaii toward the ocean. People stared at them because they stood out with their old traditional Native American clothes. The boys walked by them as if they didn’t exist. I was there sitting on the sand among the crowd but I wasn’t. It was like I was a ghost. I started to cry.

The leader, the eldest boy entered the ocean first. He gracefully glided through the glassy water. His face said it all. He was at peace and free. I cried harder.

I woke up from my dream in my bed at this point. It was as if I was really crying. The message was powerful.

Jon Riki Karamatsu writing about his dream "The Resistance" on November 5, 2021.
Jon Riki Karamatsu writing about his dream “The Resistance” on November 5, 2021.

This dream represents our desire to break free from what popular society pressures us to do. We have become slaves to it. The three Native American boys represent a life that has become extinct after the Caucasians forced them onto reservations and into re-education systems to learn their culture and language. As history has shown, much of the old ways of the Native American culture has died and can only be relived through stories. This is how important stories are. One of my screenplays about Hawaiian culture has this same message. The pressure from popular culture has been making me feel doubtful about my love for writing stories.

The Native American aspect of my dream was likely influenced by an NHK television interview I watched last night with my parents at their house in Pearl City, Hawaii. It was about Larry Littlebird, a Navajo in his senior years who overcame his suffering to find himself and his culture under the overbearing pressure to conform to popular culture. He is a storyteller who founded Hamaatsa, a place to reconnect with nature with indigenous wisdom, by listening to nature and to each other in this challenging time.

The beach scene in Hawaii represents my desire to be with the ocean and sand, a place where I feel connected to nature. I am at peace there. The pressure of whether or not I should get back with the program of popular culture or continue to rebel against it has been weighing heavy on my shoulders.

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I hold the warmth of your lonely soul – Part 2


I hold the warmth of your lonely soul.

I hold the warmth of your lonely soul.

I hold the warmth of your lonely soul.

Let your fears go.

Let them fly away and dissipate.

That’s how we’ll make our escape.

– +positive masters+, Jon Riki Karamatsu, Poem, 6/22/2019 –

You can be physically lonely, and you can be mentally lonely. Your fears can control your mind. You may keep them within you because you don’t want anyone to see your vulnerability. However, by talking about your fears to someone who is understanding, that person may be able to help you to take the necessary steps to push away your perception of your fears, which are often distorted. Talk therapy or psychotherapy with an understanding person can help you break out of your blown out of proportion perception.

In nonattachment, a practice developed in Buddhism, feel your negative emotions but don’t let them be attached to you and bring you down. In the Eightfold Path, the first of the eight practices is to have a right understanding, which is to do your best to understand the truth. Ask yourself, “What is the truth to your fears?” Are your fears real, or are you imagining them? For example, if you’re telling yourself you’re not good enough to succeed, is that really true? No, you’ve succeeded before. Yes, you’ve failed in the past, but that was a part of the process of your growth that led you to succeed again. When you look back in your life, you’ll identify how you’ve made your comeback from your failures. You see, your fears are often filled with things that aren’t true. Don’t let your fears be attached to you. Understand your fears, and let them flow through you so you don’t get held back by them.

Another mindset practice that we mentioned in previous blog posts is the middle way practice that was also developed in Buddhism, which is to stay in the middle of your life’s journey. In this case, by staying in the middle way, you’ll be able to see your extreme perceptions of your fears at a distance to the side or both sides, but you can move past them as your proceed down the middle path.

Combine the middle way practice with psychotherapy, cognitive therapy, nonattachment, and right understanding as an arsenal of tools to overcome your fears.

I wrote the poem pictured in this blog post over a year ago. In it, the protagonist tells his lover to let go of her fears after she bravely reveals them to him (psychotherapy and non attachment). He not only keeps her warm physically, but mentally and spiritually.

With Warmest Aloha,
Jon

Enter the +positive masters+ universe at www.positivemasters.com for mindset practices, motivational writing, wealth development strategies, and inspirational apparel to boost your happiness and counter any anxiety, sadness, or anger you may be facing.

 

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Let’s keep moving forward as hard as we can!


Let’s keep moving forward as hard as we can! I feel your sacrifice, tears, anxiety, and fears, but the value you provide will help us all enjoy a fuller life. We’re in this journey together to better our world. I thought this picture of a lamborghini speeding ahead would energize you with happy energy, and put a smile on your face as you continue your daily practice towards your goals. Let’s get some wins today!!!

#work #dailypractice #goals #tenacity #perserverance #journey #tears #sacrifice #anxiety #fears #entrepreneur #entrepreneurship #business #attorney #law #motivation #mindfulness #gratitude

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